"NOTHING DISAPPEARS, BUT EVERYTHING IS TRANSFORMED" - TESLAR SIA

The quantum revolution in resource management and a new word in resource-based economy

THE TRUTH IN THE DEPTH
- Democritus, the father of nanotechnology, 460-370 BC

"Pollution is nothing but the resources we are not harvesting. We allow them to disperse because we've been ignorant of their value."
- R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER. 1937 year


2000 year

Nobel Prize in physics

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN!
PRACTICALLY EVERYTHING THAT IS NECESSARY FOR A MODERN HUMAN FOR LIFE AND ACTIVITY CAN BE MADE FROM ATOMS AND MOLECULES, EVERYTHING FROM FOOD TO NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS WILL GIVE US NANOROBOTS. FROM THE DIRT REMAINING ON THE CARPET AFTER YOU WOKE YOUR FEET.
- Zhores Alferov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2000.
2004 year

Nobel Prize in physics

Graphene was transferred from theoretical to practical science in 2004 and has already established itself as one of the most promising materials.

The reason for this is its physical and mechanical characteristics: its thickness is 1 atom, high flexibility, strength is higher than that of steel and excellent ability to conduct electric current and heat. Graphene is a very, very promising material that will allow many industries to reach new frontiers.

More than 150 organizations are producing graphene and more than 400 companies producing graphene materials or developing products containing graphene, and the number is growing.

2008-2018 YEARS

"Green" graphene

Since 2008, the TESLAR Science and Industrial Association has been actively exploring methods of using ecological nanomaterials to improve the quality of life, preserve human health and cleanse the environment. For example: since 2008: water purification and climate control systems, power supply and thermal insulation of engineering complexes (biologically adequate light for humans and phytoeffective for plants).

Since 2010, the engineers and scientists of the Association begin to develop methods for the production of atomic-molecular design. Atom by atom, programmable materials are becoming obsolete materials used in the form of heat sinks and camps, pastes, adhesives, etc. Produced graphene and graphene-containing materials in our own production of systemic sustainable life. The created nanomaterials acquire qualities that are fantastic for classical physics.

Continuous research and the search for solutions in the field of waste management allowed in 2018 a fundamentally new technology for waste management. The use of quantum technologies to master the technology of nature itself: the transformation of elements.

"Green" graphene is a nature-like technology for processing waste of all types (including toxic ones). Waste no longer exists as everything is a valuable resource, just like in nature.

The starting material can be anything: any kind of waste. Polyethylene, glass, food waste, oil products, coal, wood. Sawdust, plastic bag, any packaging or old tire can become the skin of a spaceship or an unsinkable ship, an unbreakable device or a piece of clothing with unique properties and a 100-year warranty. Even toxic waste will be rendered harmless and converted into nanomaterials with magical properties.
2020 YEAR

"Flash" graphene

In early 2020, Nature published an article on the achievements of the Applied Physics Program, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA. Colleagues - scientists reported on the development of technology for converting carbon-containing waste into graphene.

The researchers received a grant from the US Department of Energy and expects to produce a kilogram (2.2 lb) of graphene per day for two years. According to them, the process can be further expanded for production on an industrial scale. The Air Force's Division of Scientific Research and the US National Science Foundation supported the study.
Rice University, Houston, TX, USA
More than 2/3 of technologies and materials used by humans can be significantly improved by using graphene.
Some historical milestones in the development of nanotechnology
V century BC, Greek philosopher Democritus (father of nanotechnology): first used the word "atom" to describe the smallest particle of matter

1905, Swiss physicist Albert Einstein: published a scientific paper in which he showed that a sugar molecule is about 1 nm in size

1931, German physicists Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska: created an electron microscope, which for the first time allowed the study of nanoobjects

1968, Alfred Cho and John Arthur: employees of the scientific division of the American company Bell, developed the theoretical foundations of nanotechnology in surface treatment historical milestones in the development of nanotechnology

1974, Japanese physicist Norio Taniguchi: introduced the word "nanotechnology" into scientific circulation, which he proposed to name mechanisms less than 1 micron in size

1981, Swiss physicists Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer: a scanning tunneling microscope device that allows one to influence matter at the atomic level. Nobel Peace Prize in Physics for the creation of a tunneling microscope (1986)

1985, American physicists Robert Curl, Harold Kroto, Richard Smaley: created a technology that makes it possible to accurately measure objects with a diameter of one nanometer 1986, American physicists Gerd Binning, Calvin Quaite and Christopher Gerber: a scanning atomic force microscope was created that allows interaction with any materials, and not only with those conducting historical milestones in the formation of nanotechnology

1986, American futurist Eric Drexler: published a book in which he predicted that nanotechnology would soon begin to develop actively. Nanotechnology became known to the general public

1989, Donald Eigler, an employee of IBM, posted the name of his company with 35 xenon atoms 1993, the USA began to award the Feynman Prize, which is named after the physicist Richard Feynman, who in 1959 gave a prophetic speech about it in a lecture "There is plenty of space on the bottom" that many scientific problems will be solved only when scientists learn to work at the atomic level.

In 1965, Feynman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics "For his research in the field of quantum electrodynamics" (now it is one of the fields of nanoscience)

1998, Dutch physicist Sees Decker: created a nanotransistor based on nanotechnology 1999, American physicists James Tour and Mark Reed: determined that a single molecule can behave in the same way as molecular chains

2000, the US Administration supported the creation of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Nanotechnology research received state funding, the first tranche of which amounted to $ 500 million.

In 2002, the appropriation was increased to $ 604 million. In 2003, the Initiative requested $ 710 million.

In 2004, the US government decided to increase research funding to $ 3.7 billion.
Overall, global investment in nano in 2004 amounted to about $ 12 billion.

In 2010, physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov from the University of Manchester in the UK received the Nobel Prize in Physics for their discoveries in the field of graphene applications.

In 2018, scientists at the Teslar Science and Industrial Association developed a technology called "Green" graphene. This is a nature-like technology for processing waste of all types (including toxic ones) into environmentally friendly nanomaterials with desired properties (graphene and nanomaterials based on it).

2020, Scientists in the Applied Physics Program at Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA reported on progress in the technology for converting carbon-containing waste to graphene. The technology is called "Flash" graphene.